When you step into the world of London-based sculptor Ron Mueck, you might feel like you've crossed over into the Twilight Zone, and in some ways, you have. The former model maker and puppeteer for TV and movies, has been creating hyperrealistic sculptures for decades. Anyone privileged enough to stand in front of his work of art will feel like they're in "The House Of Wax" or the movie that inspired the series, "Westworld". Using a variety of materials like silicone, fiberglass and resin, Mueck's work captures human likeness to a degree of realism that you have to see to believe.

To call Mueck's sculptures life-like would be a major understatement.

From the long creepy stare, to the bushy long beard, to the hair on it’s chest, this work of art needs only to speak.

Mueck loves playing with the the scale of his sculptures.

Back in 2006, a visitor at the National Galleries of Scotland stood beside this work which he called “Wild Man”. It’s like she took something from a bottle that said “Drink Me” and shrunk.

Mueck loves playing with the the scale of his sculptures.

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"Wild Man" doesn't mind being gawked at, even by a bunch of schoolgirls.

In 2010, the clothes-challenged art piece went on display at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne.

"Wild Man" doesn't mind being gawked at, even by a bunch of schoolgirls.

Reuters/Mick Tsikas

Beauty is in this eye of the beholder, especially when you're looking at a giant sculpture of a newborn baby.

This man studies the painstaking details of this sculpture called”A Girl” at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne in 2010. Mueck spared no details, even the umbilical cord hanging by its belly button.

Beauty is in this eye of the beholder, especially when you're looking at a giant sculpture of a newborn baby.

Ron Mueck

It's hard not to be mesmerized by this creepy and amazingly awesome art.

Some spectators even find the work extremely thought provoking.

Some sculptures are emotive, like this grandma tenderly holding her grandchild in her arms.

If Mueck were to play it outside on a bench, you probably wouldn’t realize that they’re not really alive.

"In Bed" is the name of this exhibition piece, and it really says it all.

It was displayed in 2011 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Monterrey. It’s so realistic, you almost feel like jumping in the sack with her.

"In Bed" is the name of this exhibition piece, and it really says it all.

Ron Mueck

The "Woman with Sticks" awed this visitor in Paris back in 2013.

But could his Smartphone capture the intricate details of the dimpling of the flesh and muscular tension of this non-living work of art displayed at the “Fondation Cartier Pour L’Art Contemporain”?

The "Woman with Sticks" awed this visitor in Paris back in 2013.

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The strain on the face of the "Woman with Sticks" is surreal.

Fortunately, visitors in London, England got a chance to see the intricate details up close at the Hauser / Wirth Gallery in 2012.

The strain on the face of the "Woman with Sticks" is surreal.

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Size, in this case, does matter, and it's hard not to imagine this sculpture coming to life.

The art piece entitled, “Standing Woman” caught the attention of this visitor at the Towada Art Center in Aomori Prefecture in Japan back in 2008. If you stare at her long enough, you might start to think that you saw it moving.

Size, in this case, does matter, and it's hard not to imagine this sculpture coming to life.

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If you thought your child was a big baby, wait until you meet the "Boy".

Mueck, finally completed this 5-meter-tall sculpture in 2000. From the posture to the fear in its eyes, It’s so expressive. You almost want to call child protective services.

No one does faces better than Mueck, particularly this close up of "MaskII".

It’s so lifelike you can almost hear it breathing. You might also be tempted to pick its nose, but don’t.. just… don’t.

No one does faces better than Mueck, particularly this close up of "MaskII".

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Oh… who said art can't be romantic? The "Spooning Couple" will prove you wrong.

Unlike some of his other art, Mueck made this one small enough that you’d have to lean over to get a closer look. But shhh! Stop it! Keep your shenanigans under control. You don’t want to disturb them as they sleep.

Oh... who said art can't be romantic? The "Spooning Couple" will prove you wrong.

Ron Mueck

Mueck's artwork would make anyone feel like a voyeur.

It’s okay! You can touch it. The flesh is actually soft. Just don’t expect them to react, breath, or get mad. Although that would be a dream come true!

Nobody likes a pair of busy bodies gossiping around, unless it involves art.

In 2007, the sculpture called “Two Women” was on display at the Brooklyn Museum. Better sneak up and see what they’re saying about you.

There's an unspeakable humanity to Mueck's sculptures.

From the wrinkles on their faces to the bitter, judgmental expressions, these women seem to be staring the visitors down as if saying, “What are you looking at?”

Some would say that art imitates life, which makes you wonder if Mueck was really depressed when he made this.

There’s no doubt that there’s a lot of talent here, especially with the way he sculpts the body language and facial expressions. But the way he captures raw emotions makes us wonder if he’s portraying the very same emotions he once went through himself.

There's certainly no lack of detail on any of his work.

Whether he’s trying to show sadness and tension or giving off the illusion of sweat popping out of a sculpture’s skin, Mueck is the man!

It's almost a pity that these art pieces probably won't survive the test of time, like a DaVinci.

But if he ever chose to recreate these in marble, they’d probably become timeless classics. Fortunately, photos and videos will allow Mueck’s work to remain preserved, hopefully for years to come.

It's absolutely outstanding how some paint, resin, and fiberglass can make these sculptures so lifelike.

It’s clear that Mueck didn’t just add talent to these, because a lot of love is reflected in many of his pieces.

Mueck has managed to portray art in different ways.

While some reflect the simplicity and complexity of our bodies, other sculptures reflect that various stages of emotion and of our life cycles.

It's virtually impossible to reflect the bond between a mother and child through sculpture, but Mueck doesn't believe in impossible.

In 2013, Mueck’s one of a kind and amazing sculpture, “Woman with shopping” was displayed at the “Fondation Cartier Pour L’Art Contemporain” in Paris.

It's virtually impossible to reflect the bond between a mother and child through sculpture, but Mueck doesn't believe in impossible.

Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images

Source:
The Atlantic

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